The University of Edinburgh, 33 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh EH8 9JS +44 (0)131 650 4360
Information
  • Academic staff 3,31
  • Admin. staff 4,605
  • Affiliations Russell Group
  • Campus Urban
  • Chancellor HRH The Princess Royal
  • Endowment £236.512 million
  • Established 1583
  • Location Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
  • Postgraduates 10,061
  • Principal Professor Sir Timothy O'Shea
  • Students 30,377 (2011-12)
  • Type Public
  • Undergraduates 20,316
  • Universities 21
  • Universities Scotland
  • Universities UK
  • Vice principal www.ed.ac.uk
The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583,is a public research university located in Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university. Edinburgh receives approximately 47,000 applications every year, making it the third most popular university in the UK by volume of applicants.Entrance is intensely competitive, with 12 applications per place in the last admissions cycle.
The university played an important role in leading Edinburgh to its reputation as a chief intellectual centre during the Age of Enlightenment, and helped give the city the nickname of the Athens of the north. Graduates of the university include some of the major figures of modern history, including the naturalist Charles Darwin, physicist James Clerk Maxwell, philosopher David Hume, mathematician Thomas Bayes, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Gordon Brown, Deputy President of the British Supreme Court Lord Hope, surgeon and pioneer of sterilisation Joseph Lister, signatories of the American declaration of independence John Witherspoon and Benjamin Rush, inventor Alexander Graham Bell, first president of Tanzania Julius Nyerere, and a host of famous authors such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, J. M. Barrie, and Sir Walter Scott. The University is also associated with 9 Nobel Prize winners, 1 Abel Prize winner and a host of Olympic gold medallists. It also continues to have links to the British Royal Family, with the Duke of Edinburgh being chancellor from 1953 to 2010, and Princess Anne from 2011.
Campus
As its topics of study have grown and diversified the university has expanded its campuses such that it now has six main sites The Central Area includes George Square, the Informatics Forum, The Dugald Stewart Building, Old College, New College, McEwan Hall, St Cecilia's Hall, Teviot Row House, the old Medical School buildings in Teviot Place, and surrounding streets in Edinburgh's Southside. It is the oldest region, occupied primarily by the College of Humanities and Social Science, and the Schools of Computing & Informatics and the School of Law, as well as the main university library. The Appleton Tower is also used for teaching first year undergraduates in science and engineering. Meanwhile, Teviot Place continues to house pre-clinical medical courses and biomedical sciences despite relocation of the Medical School to Little France. Nearby are the main EUSA buildings of Potterrow, Teviot and Pleasance. Old residents of George Square include Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A number of these buildings are used to host events during the Edinburgh International Festival every summer. The main library (Edinburgh University Library) is also located at George Square. New College, overlooks Princes Street and only a short walk from Waverley Rail Station and other Edinburgh landmarks. The building is on the Mound, which houses the School of Divinity - parts of which are also used by the Church of Scotland.